Episode 018 — Do you Need that Animation and Speak Deliberately

  This Week’s Tip: Do you Need that Animation?   PowerPoint has lots of amazing animations and transitions. Unfortunately, many slide authors use too many of them. When a slide deck has too many animations it looks cheesy and amateurish.  It can also cause problems if you want to print slides or present via a webinar.  If you want to use transitions and animations in a slide deck, first ask,…

Episode 017 — Plan to Punt and How to Run a Panel

  This Week’s Tip: Plan to Punt   It would be great if speakers always got the amount of time they thought they would get when they arranged to speak. If they did, they could easily cover all the content in a well designed presentation. The problem is that often, the amount of time a speaker has will change at the last minute. To effectively manage your public speaking engagements,…

Episode 016 — Count Filler Words and Raise Your Energy

  This Week’s Tip: Count Filler Words   Filler words are the ums and ahhs and likes and verys of a speech. One or two are okay, but a bunch of them will annoy an audience. We usually say them while our brain tries to catch up with our mouth.   An effective speaker uses few of these since they don’t help the speaker. To get rid of them, you first…

Episode 015 — Face the Audience and Post-Event Reporting

This Week’s Tip: Face your Audience   It may seem obvious that the speaker should face the audience, but we’re probably all been in sessions where the speaker keeps turning  away from the audience to reach and watch their slides. Each time they advance the show, they turn their back to the audience again so they can read to their audience or just figure out what point to touch on…

Episode 14 — Manage your Handouts and 12 Webinar Tips

  This Week’s Tip: Manage your Handouts   In many presentations, a speaker will start introducing themselves at the beginning and immediately start passing out handouts. The audience then begins reading those handouts during one of the most important parts of the presentation – the part where the speaker sets the tone for the rest of the session.   Instead of doing that, pass out handouts only when they are…

Episode 13 — Sit in Back and The Fear of Public Speaking

This week’s Tip: Sit in the back of the room   Before you start your presentation, and before your audience enters the room, display your most complex slide, and sit in the back row.  Then sit in a few other places in the room. Your goal is to make sure you can see and read your slides from all points in the audience. You actually need to sit in the…

Episode 012 — Repeat the Question and What I Saw on a Cruise

  This Week’s Tip: Repeat the Question   When an audience member asks a question during a presentation, be sure to repeat that question. There are several reasons to do this: To make sure everyone hears it To confirm the question To summarize the question To make it easier to answer   When you do this, your session is more efficient since the audience won’t have to ask you to…

Episode 011 — Record Yourself and Tim Garber (Part 2)

This Week’s Tip: Record Yourself   When you record your practice sessions or presentations, you give yourself a powerful tool for professional growth.   When you’re in the middle of a presentation, you have a bunch of important things to focus on. Number 1 of course is your audience. Plus you can’t hear or see yourself the way your audience does. The physics of human anatomy simply make that impossible….

Episode 010 — Parallel Structure and Tim Garber (Part 1)

This Week’s Tip: Use Parallel Structure Parallel Structure is a term most often associated with writing, and it’s a powerful tool for a presenter who wants to land a powerful message. We see it in famous speeches from world leaders. It’s embedded in the Declaration of Independence. And it’s a way that any speaker can more effectively land their points.   When you use parallel structure in a talk: You…

Episode 009 — No Eye Charts and Manage Your Q&A

This Week’s Tip: No Eye Charts   Eye charts are presentation slides will small text, lots of numbers, and/or detailed charts. They might look okay on the presenter’s desk, but to the audience, they are illegible. A presenter will often apologize for the eye chart and simple state the point they want to make. The better option is not to use illegible slides at all. If the audience can’t read…