Episode 036 — Let it Go and Road Trip!

2-Minute Tip: Let it Go   When things start to go wrong, our instinct is often to panic and make a split second decision to stop whatever is falling, crashing, or coming apart at the seams. Often this is the wrong instinct. Instead, let it go, take a moment to assess the situation, and then recover. When you can do this with confidence both you and your audience will be…

Episode 035 — Let the Audience React and Ancient Rhetoric Today

  2-Minute Tip: Let the Audience Respond   When you tell a joke, make a humorous aside, show an entertaining picture, or land a heavy or emotional point, it’s important to give your audience a chance to experience the emotions you’ve just inspired in them.   That means that while you plan your presentation, and your timing, you need to allow time to respect your audience’s reaction. Remember also that…

Episode 034 — Don’t Trust the Internet and Learn from Ghost Stories

  2-Minute Tip: Don’t Trust the Internet   There are many times it seems like a good idea to use the Internet in a presentation, but if you do, make sure you have a plan B. All sorts of things can go wrong. Your audience might take up all the bandwidth. Your presentation space may have poor coverage. You could encounter too much radio interference. These problems might not show…

Episode 033 — Dim the Lights and Read The Seven Strategies of Master Presenters

    2-Minute Tip:  Dim the Lights   The data projector/projector screen combo has been a mainstay of the AV setup in conference rooms for years, but it can still be hard to see the visuals.   Data projectors have gotten brighter over the years, yet they still benefit from less ambient light. They tend to have a long lifecycle which means there are a lot of older, dimmer projectors…

Episode 032 — Use Silence and 10 Parties to Think About

  2-Minute Tip: Use Silence   Everything we do as speakers communicates something to the audience — how we move, how we dress, how we gesture, how we speak, and how we don’t speak.   Silence is a powerful tool. A speaker can use silence to:   Emphasize a point Let your audience soak up information Give your audience a break Let the audience take notes Get more detailed answers…

Episode 031 — Prep 5 Questions and a Pair of Fives

  2-Minute Tip: Prepare 5 Questions   We all want an engaged audience. Sometimes that doesn’t happen. To deal with it, have a plan before you start. Instead of scrambling for ways to engage your crowd on the fly, choose 5 questions before you start that you know you can ask. It gives you a chance to engage a quiet group in a more confident way.   Post Tip Discussion:…

Episode 030 — Say Thanks and Building a Talk

  2 Minute Tip: Say Thanks   When we conduct a successful presentation, audience members will often give us a compliment. When they do that, say, “Thanks. I appreciate that.”   Don’t tell them they’re wrong, and don’t deflect the compliment. Simply accept it with grace and thank them for their kind words.   Program Notes   2-Minute Talk Tips now has a Facebook Page. You can like us and…

Episode 029: Use a Lavalier and Learn from Star Trek: Discovery

2 Minute Tip: How to Use a Lavalier   A lavalier, or “lav,” is a small microphone a speaker will clip to their blouse, shirt, tie, collar, or jacket. That microphone usually connects to a battery pack/radio transmitter the speaker wears on their belt or waist. Usually the sound quality isn’t quite as good as a high quality hand held mic, but it can still be excellent. I like using…

Episode 028 — Confirm Value and Avoid Offensive Language

2 Minute Tip: Confirm Value At the end of a presentation, I like to ask the audience, “Was this helpful?” or “Was this valuable?”   Usually there is still a lot of energy in the room and folks will answer with an enthusiastic, “Yes!”   Obviously, this is great for my ego, but it also does a couple other things. It gives the audience members a chance to acknowledge their…

Episode 027 — Purge Stale Material and Introduce Yourself

    2 Minute Tip: Purge Stale Material   If you do a lot of public speaking, it’s likely you have some go-to lines or jokes that you like. Eventually the can stop resonating with your audience. Times change. Technology changes. Speakers grow and change. It’s important to periodically step back and maker sure your quips and comments are still relevant and getting the reaction you want. If they no…